“You should write a book about that!”

 

Your peers and business partners think you have a great idea, a novel concept, something they believe will change the world around you. They won’t stop encouraging you to start writing a book.

But you’re questioning why. Sarcastically, you say to yourself, “C’mon, really? Another book? Just what the world needs.”

The most frequent question clients ask us is, “Is my book good enough?”

Our answer? An emphatic, “Yes!” Maybe it needs editing. Maybe you even need a ghostwriter to capture your stories, voice, and intellectual concepts. But, yes, you should write that book.

 

Don’t Read This Unless You Are a Changemaker

 

I can see from here, you are a changemaker. Yes, you, reading this.

Because you’re a changemaker, the limits bother you. It’s a nagging bother, and it won’t be silent until you address it.

You have an unquenchable desire to take the influence you possess, and make positive ripples in the pond of the world around them. People want to follow you because you’re making the right kind of waves that bring life-giving change.

You want to be a thought leader.

You want to live a legacy.

 

Thought Leader Path

 

The next step lies before you on this thought leader path. Why a book? You could start a well-maintained blog, like so many hucksters have told you to do. (And if you already have, you’re getting 13 views on each one, despite spending hours writing each post.) You might even be keeping it frequently updated with your latest, greatest, innovative ideas.

We spoke with our CEO and founder Kent Gustavson on the topic. “Well-maintained blog” reminds me of getting a haircut from the (middling) barber down the street. Imagine seeing someone step out of the barber shop, and commenting, ‘That guy over there has a very well-maintained head of hair.’ His haircut is adequate. That kind of hair might not get you a job, but it won’t offend anyone. A blog is similar; it won’t offend anyone, but it won’t move you forwards.”

A book is like a canoe that conveys your ideas, while a blog is like a bucket that collects the ideas in case anyone stops by. Imagine where you last read a book. Picture the place. Now, imagine the last place you saw a blog post, and picture where you were. Think about your state of mind in both locations. What’s the difference?

The ideas conveyed by the metaphorical canoe of a book are far more refined, beautiful, and dramatic. They’ve had room to grow, have been wrestled with and challenged, forged into a more cohesive and comprehensible form.

The ideas lodged into the receptacle of a blog are often disjointed, dirty, half-formed, naked, or verbose; they are subjected to time constraints and the need for a continuous flow of “SEO-ready” content.

 

A Book Changes Everything

 

A book will change everything in your life and work.

You may be skeptical and have your doubts, but just ask anyone who has pressed a copy of their book into a spouse’s, colleague’s, or mentor’s hand. You’ll hear answers about how it changed people’s perceptions of them, as well as their perceptions of themselves.

A well-written and beautifully published book will have a similar effect as getting a high-level degree (and is usually less painful). In the words of Dr. Kent Gustavson, the CEO of Blooming Twig, “Coming from someone who earned a doctoral degree, I can verify a well-produced book is equivalent (for most of our clients) to an MBA, but it won’t cost you an arm and a leg, and you’ll be able to carry it around in your briefcase. What’s more, you will be able to hand your book to people, so that they can also improve their lives.”

How does a book change things? Gustavson speaks of the “intimate relationship” that happens between a reader and an author via the medium of a well-written book: “They will be reading your deepest thoughts with the bathroom or bedroom door closed. You will have a place of honor in that little wicker basket next to the toilet, or next to the bed (sometimes serving as an iPhone or glasses holder for the night). That intimacy is not something you could buy, and it’s not shared by any other media or advertising. Your thoughts and know-how can integrate themselves into the person’s day-to-day life.”

 

Let’s Get Started

 

Gustavson has one last challenge for you, changemaker. “How will you change your life? Why will you change your life? Answer those questions first, and then ask, ‘How will you write a book?’ (our team can easily help). Finally, ask, ‘Why will you write a book?’ That’s the question that will change your life, career, and legacy.”